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20100111
20100111
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of canada about the cabinet picks for hamid karzai. what is the concern over the choices that president karzai is making? guest: he has now made two set of choices. he nominated one slate of cabinet officials, about 24 of them. 17 were rejected by the parliament. but arlin is in a healthy move, asserting itself. this is a good thing -- the parliament is, in a healthy move, asserting itself. this is a good thing, checks and balances. he looked at the first slate of nominees by president karzai and parliament did not like them. they did confirm the most important cabinet choices from president karzai, the minister of defense and the minister of interior, which handles all of the police. the minister of finance, the minister of agriculture, when the biggest recipients of assistance. -- one of the biggest recipient of assistance. those picks are clear. president karzai has recently over the weekend submitted a second state to replace those that were rejected the first time. these are lesser-known people. the second slate are lesser- known people. many people have not heard -- many afghans h
problem, and we have to have -- that's part of the equation, and we have to have the karzai government show us that we -- it is going to truly reform. >> let's start with the karzai government, senator mccain. while you are there, president karzai is trying another time to get his cabinet approved. if he cannot even get a cabinet approved, he does not have the faith of other people in his government that these people aren't corrupt, they know how to do the basics of good governance. if we can't get to that simple first step, how want we build institutions and build roads, put people to work and build confidence in the afghan people, trust your central government, not the taliban? >> they have a long way to go in the area of corruption. but the fact the parliament rejected his nominees, i think you could look at a democratic process moving forward. i believe president karzai recognizes that what he's just been through was an important lesson to him. we have to keep pressing on the corruption issue. let me tell you two other things that concern me. first of all, i think we have the right
is a huge problem, and we have to have -- that's part of this equation. and we have to have the karzai government show us that we -- it is going to truly reform. >> let's start with the karzai government, senator mccain. while you were there, president karzai is trying another time to get his cabinet approved. if he cannot even get a cabinet approved, he does not have the faith of other people in his government that these people aren't corrupt, that they know how to do the basics of good governance. if we can't get to that simple first step, how can we build institutions, how can we repair roads, how can we put people to work, educate them in afghanistan and build the confidence of the afghan people to trust your central government, not the taliban? >> well, they have a long way to go in the area of corruption. but the fact the parliament rejected his nominees, i think you could look at a democratic process moving forward. i believe that president karzai recognizes that what he's just been through was an important lesson to him. we have to keep pressing on the corruption issue. but let
there be a second runoff. thereby, and taking the initial count down under 50% and having president karzai except that, which was a good step for afghanistan. the runoff never happened, but at least the ecc was able to maintain its independence and show that the rule of law does matter to some degree in afghanistan. with that, let me briefly introduced are three distinguished speakers and turn it over to them to speak just for a few minutes, no more than 10 minutes each. to my far left is scott worden. he has just returned to the institute here. he was on a leave of absence last year to work as one of the three international members of the electoral complaints commission. scott was also involved in the elections in 2005, the parliament. you have their bios in their -- in front of you. isabel is sitting next to scott wright -- scott's right. she has worked in afghanistan at back in 2005 as a political adviser and knows quite a lot -- knows quite a lot about the afghanistan elections. to my left is a grant kippen. he was the chairman of the ecc both in 2005 and this past year in 2009. but scott and
about the cabinet picks, the selections of hamid karzai. cabinet crisis reveals karzai's weakening grasp. lawmakers unhappy with the president's pick. what is the concern over the choices? >> guest: president karzai has made two sets of choices. he nominated once slate of cabinet officials about 24 of them. seventeen were rejected by the parliament. the parliament in a healthy move is asserting itself. this is a good thing. have some balancing, checks and balances as we understand them. so the parliament looked at the first slate of nominees from karzai and did not like many of them. rejected them. the parliament did choose, did agree, and did confirm several of the most important cabinet choices from president karzai, minister of defence and minister of interior which handles all the police, minister of finance, minister of agriculture. one of the big recipients of assistance. so the cabinet in this area somewhat. president karzai has recently submitted a second slate to replace those that were rejected the first time. these are lesser-known people. the second slate of lesser-known peop
karzai is riding the postelection ride of hope, abc news and our partners sent pollsters out door to door taking the pulse of 1,500 people, asking them about ordinary life. also, that covering for women, the burqa. should it be the husband's decision or hers? in this country a split decision. the majority of men say it's the husband's choice. this woman added perspective. my husband's not the problem, she says. it's the taliban i'm afraid of. and sometimes small signes of progress. 60% of the poll says they are cell phones. every one of you as a cell phone? but 85% of them say they have no refrigerator. and few of hope of such a thing. and one more sobers number. more than half of afghans say they have never been to school. and we'll be back with more from afghanistan later. now, we head back to new york and general stephanopoulos with the other day news. >>> still ahead "world news," a public apology from the senate majority leader. >>> and mark mcgwire finally comes kpleen about using steroids with enhe broke one of baseball's record. what is behind today's confession? i'm just a skepti
. not so much optimism so much that they have received that hamid karzai is the winner and the united states is in again in a big way. >> is there also a reality in that their daily lives are improving? >> the improvements have been gradual. there is only a little improvement on transportation and education. there is no improvement on their sense of security from the taliban. they have seen some improvements. they are not dramatic. what has changed is their estimation of what the next few years will bring. they are staking out their future that the americans will somehow prevail. >> looked, they're saying this strategy is working. flexed too early to say that it is working, but i would say that there is a battle for the sections to be one -- >> it is too early to say that it is working, but i would said there's a battle for the elections of the future. afghanistan may be turning a corner. but there's also a lot wrong with the ordinary lives of afghans. over the last five years it has increased, but it could fade away. >> you mentioned that people were aware that the election was fraud
for the electoral process. it was a sickness can step. we are now watching closely as the karzai yet patrician and parliament put together the key ministers of the national government. we are going to continue our efforts in afghanistan but we also recognize, as the president outlined, we need to continue to move as rapidly as possible because clearly we want as i am sure the afghan people want to be able to see this transition where functions that may well be done today by the national community that we are building up the capacity for the government to be able to assume these responsibilities over the next couple of years. >> i have a question about a related country, and i would be human. haleh tomb are you to be anti-american, anti-western or antiforeign sentiment in yemen and do you have any concerns that those feelings would hinder or hurt your attempt to to help the yemenis government? >> well, i think we continue to look for ways in which we can support the yemeni government on military bases, civilian basis and economic basis and we are encouraged by the recent comments by the preside
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)